CFP: Advanced Concepts for Intelligent Vision Systems

William F. Gilreath (william.gilreath@usm.edu)
Wed, 12 May 1999 06:03:00 +0200 (MET DST)

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Special Session on

ADVANCED CONCEPTS FOR INTELLIGENT VISION SYSTEMS
Baden-Baden (Germany)

held in conjunction with

The 11-th International Conference on Systems Research,
Informatics and Cybernetics

2 - 7 August 1999
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FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS

* GENERAL SCOPE

Image Processing gathers a wide field of approaches which aim at
making systems as autonomous as possible. Hundreds of sophisticated
techniques do exist in the toolbox of today's engineers which help to
cope with a number of industrial and scientific applications in
constant growth.

However, there is currently no mature common framework for using
them and understanding the mechanisms at work from the early stage of
low level Image Processing to the highest level of Vision. Whatever
the vision paradigm at work is (from data-driven vision to
goal-directed vision), algorithms have to be tunable or adaptive,
their performances have to be assessed and one must exhibit control
laws of their parameters with respect to their result. It is the price
to be paid for plugging software boxes into bigger and coherent
complex systems.

This special session is mainly concerned with providing (partial)
answers to this particular scientific issue; of course, any papers
presenting novel Image Processing techniques are welcome.

* TOPICS include but are not limited to

1) THEORETICAL TOOLS FOR A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK: in order to embed the
problem within the correct theoretical background, the first track
deals with any aspect of the relationship between the digital image
and the symbolic and semantic space.

- measures of information, relationship between numerical and symbolic
information
- multiresolution theory
- scale-space theory
- variational methods
- fractals and multifractals
- formal languages theory for pattern recognition
- biologically-inspired vision

2) OPTIMAL AND ADAPTIVE ALGORITHMS: adaptive algorithms have been
designed for taking into account the large variability of online
conditions. Such algorithms yield results whose resolution and
accuracy are a function of the data itself. The impact of local
adaptivity on the design of systems must be considered throughout
topics like:

- adaptive filtering and image restauration
- adaptive segmentation
- model-based algorithms
- semantic image compression
- tools for adaptive algorithms

3) ASSESSMENT OF IMAGE PROCESSING ALGORITHMS: whatever the control
law of an algorithm may be, it must on the one hand operate on an
efficient algorithm and on the other hand take into account some
quality criterion of the computed result. Valid topics include
scientific studies (results comparisons, performance metrics),
reviews of available techniques (benchmarks and frameworks) as well
as industrial applications.

- objective metrics
- perceptually based distortion metrics
- video quality evaluation
- subjective ratings of compression algorithms
- professional applications (medical, military, etc.)
- empirical methods for assessing IP algorithms
- software tools and databases for performance evaluation

4) FROM TUNING TO CONTROLLING VISION SYSTEMS: once vision components
have been optimized, adapted and assessed and that the complex
system running them has been characterized, this latter must know
how to control its "organs"to achieve its task. Obviously, such an
issue can be adressed today as a whole and thus, the following
topics focus on the tools needed for setting up the problem.

- model selection and validation
- fuzzy modelling for pattern recognition and vision applications
- nonlinear system identification
- learning and nonlinear optimization
- multilayer perceptrons
- simulated annealing
- recurrent networks
- genetic algorithms

* IMPORTANT DATES

May 31, 1999 (Monday): Abstract due (3 pages)
June 14, 1999 (Monday): Draft papers due (4 / 8 pages)
July 12, 1999 (Monday): Notification of acceptance
July 27, 1999: Camera-Ready papers
August 2 - 7, 1999: ACIVS Symposium

* ELECTRONIC ABSTRACT AND PAPER SUBMISSION

Authors can send either an abstract or a draft paper. Abstracts
should be about 3 pages long; the maximum length for draft and full
papers is 4 pages for a short paper and 8 pages for a long paper. Both
must be in LaTex format (with standard LaTex style and figures as
encapsulated PS) but the abstract may also be sent in PostScript or
ascii text format; they can be sent by e-mail to either member of the
committee:

Jacques.Blanc-Talon@etca.fr
Dan.Popescu@cmis.csiro.au

More information on the conference can be found at: http://www.iias.edu

* MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION - REVIEW PROCESS

All submissions will be reviewed by members of the International
programme Committee but additional reviewers will be consulted if
needed. The average review time is about four weeks, thus notification
based on abstracts submissions will be received earlier. Authors of
accepted papers will be informed in time (by e-mail if available) of
the required format for camera-ready paper submissions. In order for
reviewers to be able to assess the submissions, the extended abstract
has to provide sufficient material about the background to the problem,
the novelty of the obtained results and the results achieved, the
conclusions drawn and some recent references. Up to three keywords
should be supplied. All submitted papers have to be original,
unpublished and not submitted for publication elsewhere.

* PROCEEDINGS

All accepted papers will be published in the Conference
Proceedings, but due to the short time between this CFP and the
conference, the proceedings may not be available at the
conference. In any case, they will be sent to the authors as soon as
possible.

* SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS

Dr Jacques Blanc-Talon
Geographie-Imagerie-Perception
CTA/GIP
16 bis, Avenue Prieur de la cote d'or,
94114, Arcueil, FRANCE
Jacques.Blanc-Talon@etca.fr

Dr Dan Popescu
Division of Mathematical and Information Science
CMIS/CSIRO
GPO Box 664
Canberra, ACT 2601 AUSTRALIA
Dan.Popescu@cmis.CSIRO.AU

* GENERAL CONFERENCE CHAIR

Prof. George E. Lasker
I.I.A.S. & Department of Computer Science
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario, CANADA

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