AIMDM99 tutorials (31)

Steve Rees (sr@vision.auc.dk)
Thu, 15 Apr 1999 15:44:41 +0200 (MET DST)

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AIMDM'99
TUTORIALS AND WORKSHOPS
----------------------------------------------

As you might have already heard this years joint meeting of the
societies of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Europe (AIME) and
the European Society of Medical Decision Meking (ESMDM), entitled
AIMDM'99, will take place in Aalborg, Denmark, 20th-24th June 1999.

AIMDM'99 icludes a day of tutorials and workshops which have now been
finalised. These will take place on Sunday 20th June at Hotel Hvide
Hus,Vesterbro 2, 9000-Aalborg. Tutorials will be run in parallel and last
for a half a day, with morning tutorials taking place from 9 am to
12:30 pm and afternoon tutorials from 1:30 pm to 5pm. Workshops will
also be run in parallel, each workshop lasting the whole day.
Registration for a single tutorial costs 400 DKK. Registration for a
workshop costs 500 DKK for AIMDM'99 participants or 750 DKK
otherwise. Registration for a workshop includes lunch.

Please note that tutorials are only open to those registering for the
main AIMDM'99 conference. Registration for AIMDM'99 (excluding
tutorials and workshops) costs 2550 before May 15th and 3000
DKK after, or for students 1400 DKK before May 15th or 1800 DKK
after.

Details of the tutorials and workshops are now given, followed by a
registration form. Please send your completed form to:

AIMDM99
Aalborg Turist og Kongres Bureau A/S
Østerågade 8, Postbox 1862
DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark

For further details of other activities occurring as part of the
AIMDM`99 conference please visit our web site at:
http://www.miba.auc.dk/AIMDM99/

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TUTORIALS
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1) NATURAL LANGUAGE GENERATION

Audience: Researchers and software developers who are interested in
improving the quality of documents and other written materials
produced by software systems.

Description:
Many medical IT systems need to produce documents or other types of
written texts, such as discharge reports, letters to patients, and
explanations of expert-system reasoning. The quality and readability
of such texts is not always as high as it could be, unfortunately.

This tutorial will discuss some of the linguistic problems that
computer-generated texts can suffer from, such as poor rhetorical
structure, inappropriate anaphors, false implicatures, and grammatical
mistakes. Natural-language generation (NLG) technology is introduced,
and it is discussed how it can be used to automatically produce texts
which satisfy linguistic constraints and hence do not suffer from
these problems. The tutorial will be illustrated with examples from
NLG systems developed at Aberdeen and elsewhere.

Attendees do not need any background in linguistics or
natural-language processing, but they should be familiar with basic AI
concepts. I hope that even people who do not intend to use NLG
technology will still benefit from the tutorial, by becoming more
aware of potential linguistic problems in computer-generated texts and
how they can be resolved.

Tutorial Presenter

Ehud Reiter
Dept of Computing Science, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE,
UK. Phone +44-1224-273443, Fax +44-1224-273422, email:
ereiter@csd.abdn.ac.uk

2) THE PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDICAL DECISION MAKING

This course is intended for clinicians, and others who wish to gain
insight into the psychological factors influencing their decision
making under uncertainty.

The aim of this tutorial is to increase understanding of the
psychological processes involved in medical decision making. This
knowledge is useful in trying to improve decision making. Additionally
it is a fruitful area for research. The course assumes the attendee
has only a basic knowledge of the subject matter.

The clinician's reasoning is a partial cause of non-optimal medical
decisions. The cognitive psychology of judgment and decision making
offers explanations of how some of these reasoning errors are made.
The course will review the basic nature of expert medical reasoning,
to discover possibilities for capitalizing on its strengths and
supporting its weaknesses. The participant will learn why the human
cognitive system, with its large memory, limited attention span, and
powerful pattern recognition ability, seems destined to operate by
automatic "scripted" response rather than thoughtful deliberation.

We will demonstrate the implications of clinicians' cognitive
processes for two basic activities of rational decision making:
diagnosis and choosing a course of action. Clinicians' reasoning
strategies, motivations, habits, and cognitive limitations can lead
them to make errors of diagnosis, and define the methods they can use
to seek and use information more rationally. Clinicians' strategies
for predicting what will happen can lead to misjudgments of
probability, and their methods of evaluating things can lead to
misjudgments of treatment consequences. Understanding the
psychological processes involved will suggest methods for helping
clinicians reason better about the probabilities of outcomes and about
their own or their patients' preferences.

Tutorial presenters

Robert M. Hamm
Clinical Decision Making Program, Department of Family and Preventive
Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 900 NE 10th
St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, U.S.A. Telephone: 405/271-8000 ext
3-2302, Fax: 405/271-2784, e-mail:robert-hamm@ouhsc.edu

Clare Harries
Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street,
London, WC1E 6BT, U.K.Telephone: +44 171 504 5389, Fax: +44 171 436
4276, e-mail: clare.harries@ucl.ac.uk

Jack Dowie, PhD
Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Open University, Milton
Keynes, MK7 6AA, U.K. Telephone: +44 171 254 7576, Fax: +44 171 254
7576, e-mail: j.a.dowie@open.ac.uk

3) DATA MINING TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS IN MEDICINE

With the widespread use of medical information systems that include
databases which have recently featured explosive growth in their
sizes, physicians and medical researchers are faced with a problem of
making use of the stored data. The traditional manual data analysis
has become insufficient, and methods for efficient computer-assisted
analysis indispensable, in particular those of data mining and other
related techniques of knowledge discovery in databases and intelligent
data analysis.

This tutorial will address current techniques and applications of data
mining in medicine. We will provide an overview of data mining
methods, including symbolic data mining (mining of decision rules,
association rules, decision trees, inductive logic programming,
hierarchical concept discovery, etc.) and subsymbolic data mining
(instance based learning, neural nets, Naive Bayesian classifier,
etc). Specific evaluation techniques and statistical criteria suited
for medical applications will be discussed. Selected data
preprocessing and data visualization methods will also be presented.

The participants of tutorial will get familiar with
* fundamental concepts data mining and knowledge discovery in data
bases * an overview of data mining methods, * specific data mining
methods, including decision trees and rules, association rules, and
naive Bayesian classifier * metrics that can be used to assess the
quality and interestingness of discovered relationships * how
intelligent data analysis is different from common statistical
approaches and how it can complement it * what features should be
supported by a particular data mining tool to be useful for medical
data analysis * how to successfully integrate data mining techniques
within existing medical information system

Intended audience:
This tutorial will be of interest to clinicians, medical researchers,
information technology professionals, information systems developers
and managers, data analysts and institutional decision makers, and
anyone else interested in applying modern data analysis methods to
extract useful knowledge from medical data bases.

Tutorial presenters

Blaz Zupan (1,2) and Nada Lavrac (2)

(1) University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Computer and Information
Sciences Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia. phone: +386 61 177
3380, fax: +386 61 125 1038 e-mail: blaz.zupan@fri.uni-lj.si (2) J.
Stefan Institute, Department of Intelligent Systems Jamova 39, SI-1000
Ljubljana, Slovenia. phone: +386 61 177 3272, fax: +386 61 125 1038.
e-mail: nada.lavrac@ijs.si

4) HOW TO BUILD A CAUSAL PROBABILISTIC NETWORK

A Causal Probabilistic Network, also called Bayesian network is a
flexible and efficient framework for reasoning under uncertainty, and
it has established itself as a practical method for knowledge
representation and inference in a number of medical areas. The
framework consists of a structural part, where the domain in question
is modelled through a directed acyclic graph, and a quantitative part,
where the impact between nodes in the graph are represented as
conditional probabilities.
This tutorial will through examples give an informal introduction to
theory and use of CPNs in connection with decision theory. The
participants will obtain hands-on experience with the construction of
a small CPN, including the acquisition of structure and conditional
probabilities.

Tutorial presenters
Finn V. Jensen
Dept. of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7,
DK-9000 Aalborg Øst, Denmark. Phone: +4596358903, email: fvj@cs.auc.dk

Steen Andreassen
Dept. of Medical Informatics and Image Analysis, Aalborg University,
Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, DK-9000 Aalborg Øst, Denmark. Phone:
+4596358812, Fax: +4598154008, email: sa@miba.auc.dk

5) FOUNDATIONS OF PREFERENCE THEORY AND QUALITY OF LIFE ADJUSTMENT.

The methods of preference assessment and quality of life adjustment
are widely applied in the medical decision making and
cost-effectiveness literature. Yet, the theory and assumptions that
underlie the use of these methods are poorly understood. The
objectives of this short course are to provide experienced practioners
with a quick and accessible introduction to the underpinnings of
utility theory, with an emphasis on the relevance, power, and
limitations of these assumptions in health and medical contexts.
Topics to be covered will include: the theory of choice and
preference; traditional models of individual decision making under
uncertainty, including the von-Neumann - Morgenstern expected utility
framework; the additional assumptions that support the use of
multi-attribute utility functions and quality-adjusted life-years; and
the difficulties encountered when the theory is extended beyond the
individual to represent choice at the societal level.

Tutorial presenter

Jospeh S. Pliskin, Ph.D.
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management and Department of
Health Policy and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev,Beer-Sheva, Israel. P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel.Tel:
972-7-6472219,Fax: 972-7-6472958 email: jpliskin@bgumail.bgu.ac.il

6) HOW TO READ (AND MAYBE PERFORM) A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW (METAANALYSIS)

Physicians are committed to manage their patients according to the
best available evidence. Systematic reviews are about asking the
relevant questions; obtaining the published material (all of it); and
extracting the evidence. In the tutorial we will address the following
questions:
1. Why do we need systematic reviews?
2. How to put the questions?
3. How to formulate a relevant protocol?
4. How to collect the pertinent studies?
5. How to evaluate the methodological soundness of the studies? Does
it matter?
6. How to obtain data from the studies and how to combine it?
7. How to explore heterogeneity and why is it so important?
8. How to check for biases?
9. How to present results?
10. Does metaanalysis work?

Tutorial presenters

Karla Soares Weiser, Leonard Leibovici
Department of Medicine E, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-tiqva 49100,
Israel; Tel 972 3 9376501; fax 972 3 9376505; e-mail
leibovic@post.tau.ac.il

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AIMDM99 - Workshops
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1) COMPUTERS IN ANAESTHESIA AND INTENSIVE CARE

The care of critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and
during Anaesthesia is becoming increasingly complex. Clinicians are
required to rapidly interpret and respond to a large number of
clinical parameters, selecting appropriate treatment for the patient
among many different options. New measurement technology has increased
the demand for improved information management, as has the need to
monitor and assess the quality of care provided. This workshop
presents "State of the art" applications of information technology for
clinicians, researchers and industry working in Anaesthesia and
Intensive care. · Topics of particular interest include those related
to supporting clinical decision making, including · Decision support
systems: clinical guidelines and protocols; model based advisory
systems; monitoring and intelligent alarming; and the application of
Artificial Intelligence methodology in Anaesthesia and Intensive care.
· Computer systems for control and assessment of quality of care. ·
Information management: visualization and interpretation of clinical
data; planning and scheduling of critical care resources. In addition
Patient Data Management systems will be presented by representatives
from industry. Scientific committee: Silvia Miksch (Chair) (A),
Steen Andreassen (DK), Michel Dojat (F), Jim Hunter (UK), Christian
Popow (A), Steve Rees (DK), Per Thorgaard (DK).

2) PROGNOSTIC MODELS IN MEDICINE: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND
DECISION ANALYTIC APPROACHES.

Prognostic models are increasingly used in medicine to predict the
natural course of disease, or the expected outcome after treatment.
Prognosis forms an integral part of systems for treatment selection
and treatment planning. In evaluating quality of care, prognostic
models are used for predicting outcome, such as mortality, which is
compared with the actual measured outcome. Furthermore, prognostic
models may play an important role in guiding diagnostic problem
solving, e.g. by only requesting information concerning tests, of
which the outcome affects knowledge of the prognosis.

In recent years several methods and techniques from the fields of
artificial intelligence, decision theory and statistics have been
introduced into models of the medical management of patients
(diagnosis, treatment, follow-up); in some of these models, assessment
of the expected prognosis constitutes an integral part. Typically,
recent prognostic methods rely on explicit (patho)physiological
models, which may be combined with traditional models of life
expectancy. Examples of such domain models are causal disease models,
and physiological models of regulatory mechanisms in the human body.
Such model-based approaches have the potential to facilitate the
development of actual systems, because the medical domain models can
be (partially) obtained from the medical literature.

Various methods have been suggested for the representations of such
domain models ranging from quantitative and probabilistic approaches
to symbolic and qualitative ones. Semantic concepts such as time, e.g.
for modelling the progressive changes of regulatory mechanisms, have
formed an important and challenging modelling issue. Moreover,
automatic learning techniques of such models have been proposed. When
model construction is hard, less explicit domain models have been
studied such as the use of case-based and neural network
representations and their combination with more explicit domain
models. In medical decision analysis, where the theories of
probability and utility are combined, various representations and
techniques are suggested such as decision trees, regression models,
and representations in which advantage is taken from the Markov
assumption (such as in Markov decision problems).

This workshop aims at bringing together various theoretical and
practical approaches to computational prognosis that comprise the
state of the art in this field. This workshop is a follow up on the
initiative started with the successful invited session on "Intelligent
Prognostic Methods in Medical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning" in
1998 during the conference "Computational Engineering in Systems
Applications 1998" (cesa'98)
(http://www.cs.ruu.nl/~lucas/ipm-cesa98.html) which has resulted in a
special issue on prognosis of the journal Artificial Intelligence in
Medicine.

Scientific committee: Ameen Abu-Hanna (Co-Chair) (H), Peter Lucas
(Co-Chair) (H), S. Andreassen (DK), P.M.M. Bossuyt (H), J. Fox (UK),
J.D.F. Habbema (H), P. Haddawy (USA), P. Hammond (UK), E. Keravnou
(Cyprus), N. Lavrac (Slovenia), J. van der Lei (H), L. Ohno-Machado
(USA), M. Ramoni (UK), M. Stefanelli (I), Th.Wetter (D), J.Wyatt (UK)

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REGISTRATION FORM
-----------------------------------------------------

Kindly complete in capitals and mail to:

Aalborg Tourist and Convention Bureau, AIMDM'99,
P.O. Box 1862, DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark.

Family name.......................................................
Firstname.........................................................
Organisation......................................................
Address...........................................................
City...............................State..........................
Country.........................Zip Code..........................
Telephone.....................Fax.................................
E-Mail............................................................
_________________________________________

Please tick here if you have already registered for AIMDM'99 and wish
to extend your registration to include tutorials or a workshop
................

CONFERENCE FEES
Fees are in Danish Kroner (DKK).

Before May 15th 99 2550 .................
After May 15th 99 3000 .................
Student before May 15th 99 1400 .................
Student after May 15th 99 1800 .................

Please tick selected tutorials or workshop
Tutorials
1)NATURAL LANGUAGE
GENERATION .........................................

2)THE PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDICAL
DECISION MAKING ...............................................

3) DATA MINING TECHNIQUES AND
APPLICATIONS IN MEDICINE ......................................

4)HOW TO BUILD A CAUSAL
PROBABILISTIC NETWORK ........................................

5) FOUNDATIONS OF PREFERENCE THEORY
AND QUALITY OF LIFE ADJUSTMENT.....................

6) HOW TO READ (AND MAYBE
PERFORM) A SYSTEMATIC
REVIEW (METAANALYSIS) ......................................

Workshops

1) COMPUTERS IN ANAESTHESIA
AND INTENSIVE CARE ...........................................

2) PROGNOSTIC MODELS IN MEDICINE:
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND DECISION
ANALYTIC APPROACHES...........................................

TUTORIAL FEES
One Tutorial 400 DKK ..............
Two Tutorials 800 DKK ..............

WORKSHOP FEES
Workshop only 750 .................
Workshop for AIMDM'99 participants 500 .................

SOCIAL EVENTS
Conference dinner 300 .................
Midsummer eve 180 .................
Guided Tour of Aalborg 50 .................

Total of registration fees (DKK) .................
________________________________________________________________

PAYMENT

Payment of the registration fees (conference, social events and
workshop) should be made in Danish Kroner net of all bank charges and
commissions. Please make sure that your name, address and "AIMDM'99"
are clearly written on all forms of payment and transfer documents.

Payment of registration fees can be made by:

Bankers' cheque issued in Danish Kroner and drawn on a Danish bank.
(Danish participants may pay by ordinary cheque)

Bank or giro transfer to Aalborg Tourist and Convention Bureau's
account no: 639.5171 in BG Bank, Girostroeget 1, DK-0800 Hoje
Taastrup, Denmark. Bank sorting code: 1199. SWIFT: BIK UD KKK.

Credit card. We accept the following cards, please tick

_ Eurocard _ JCB _ Visa
_ Access _ Mastercard _ Diners
_ American Express

Card no ...............................Date of expiry.................
Card holder...........................................................
Signature.............................................................
______________________________________________________________________

ACCOMMODATION

Date of arrival |__ _|__ _|__ _|, Departure |__ _|__ _|__ _|

Number of Nights __

single _ double _ (please tick)

Hotel Hvide Hus _ 625 _ 750
(conference venue)

Hotel Chagall _ 600 _ 730
(8 min walk)

Hotel Aalborg Soemandshjem _ 415 _ 550
(15 min walk)

The deadline for hotel bookings is Friday, May 14th, 1999. After this
date accommodation cannot be guaranteed. Payment for accommodation
should be made directly to the hotel on departure. No deposit is
required but participants will be liable in case of no-show without
prior cancellation.
____________________________________

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