BISC Seminar Announcement, Friday October 16th, 3-4pm , 310 Soda

Frank Hoffmann (fhoffman@cs.berkeley.edu)
Wed, 14 Oct 1998 14:40:27 +0200 (MET DST)

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B I S C S e m i n a r A n n o u n c e m e n t
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Human-Centered Computing
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Speaker : John Canny
EECS
UC Berkeley
jfc@cs.berkeley.edu

Date: Friday, October 16th, 1998
Time: 3-4pm
Location : 310 Soda Hall

Abstract

The personal computer is reaching the limits of its market. Yet there
are tens of billions of embedded computers, and that number is still
growing exponentially. The next generation of these devices will have
network interfaces and be embedded in network appliances. The future
of computing is not computers per se, but computation-rich
environments. The challenge with ubiquitous computing is that the
machine no longer defines its context (as in a particular interface
that a human learns), and instead they must operate in human
contexts. Designing new applications for ubiquitous computing requires
a deep understanding of those contexts. This spring at Berkeley we
initiated a very large interdisciplinary project on "Human-Centered
Computing" (HCC). HCC seeks to understand the social and psychological
contexts of computing, so that novel applications can be conceived and
so that technology can be effectively designed for them. We want to
make computing useful in new contexts, and accessible to the widest
range of people. i.e. HCC aims to bring computing to people, by
understanding where and how they live and work.

The HCC consortium is not a single research project, but an umbrella
group that incubates focussed interdisciplinary research. We seek to
identify technical research challenges from the top down. This talk
will summarize the HCC philosophy and then mention 3 current research
projects under the HCC umbrella. The first is on 3D direct interaction
with virtual objects, the second on strong telepresence or
"tele-embodiment" and the third is on social network analysis of web
content and user access patterns.

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Please direct questions with regard to the contents of the talk
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Frank Hoffmann                               UC Berkeley
Computer Science Division                    Department of EECS
Email: fhoffman@cs.berkeley.edu              phone: 1-510-642-8282
URL: http://http.cs.berkeley.edu/~fhoffman   fax:  1-510-642-5775
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