Re: Functions defined by fuzzy rules

Dimitri Lisin (dima@wpi.edu)
Mon, 6 Apr 1998 02:22:44 +0200 (MET DST)

That's the problem. The responses were either "why would you want to do
this in the first place", or "I also want to know how to do this". So far
the only sensible solution I have, is to use equal isosceles triangles for
mambership funtions, which would approximate a function with streight line
segments. I was kind of hoping to do better than that...

Why can't I find anything about this in the literature?

Dimay

On 30 Mar 1998, Gal Kaminka wrote:

> Dimitri,
>
> I am also interested in this. I'd appreciate it (and I'm sure
> others will too) if you post a summary of responses back to the
> forum.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Gal
>
> Dimitri Lisin (dima@wpi.edu) wrote:
> : Greetings, All.
>
> : I am rather new to this field, as the case seems to be with most people
> : who post questions here.
>
> : The little that I understand abut fuzzy logic is that a fuzzy inferencing
> : system, i.e. a set of fuzzy rules that relate, say, two variables
> : approximate a function. What I may need to do, is take a regular
> : algebraic function, for example y = x^2, and generate a set of fuzzy rules
> : relating x and y that approximate the function (on some interval). Can
> : anyone point me to any literature on the subject?
>
> : Another question, more out of curiosity than necessity. If a function is
> : defined in terms of a set of fuzzy rules, is it possible to differentiate
> : or integrate it? Any literature discussing this?
>
> : Dima Lisin
> : dima@cs.wpi.edu
> : http://www.wpi.edu/~dima/
>
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Gal A. Kaminka galk@isi.edu/galk@usc.edu http://www.isi.edu/soar/galk/
> Research Assistant, Applied Philosopher USC Information Sciences Institute
> "Death is an engineering problem." -- Bart Kosko, "Fuzzy Thinking"
> "But life is not an engineering task." -- Gal A. Kaminka
>
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