BISC: Panel Dicussion and FLINT 2001; August 14-17

From: masoud nikravesh (nikraves@eecs.berkeley.edu)
Date: Mon Aug 13 2001 - 21:26:59 MET DST

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    *********************************************************************
    Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing (BISC)
    *********************************************************************

    FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO ATTEND THE FLINT 2001
    WORKSHOP.
    =====================================================
    F L I N T 2 0 0 1
    NEW DIRECTIONS IN ENHANCING THE POWER OF THE INTERNET
    2001 BISC INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP
    AUGUST 14-18, 2001
    ======================================================

    Dear Colleagues;

    During the FLINT workshop, in addition to formal and informal talks,
    there will be four keynote talks, more than twelve plenary and
    distinguished
    lectures and four panel discussions (Over 25 panelist and hosted by
    Executive Producer from KQED TV) .

    FOR THOSE OF YOU THAT WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO ATTEND THE WORKSHOP:
    ===============================================================

    1. To be part of the FLINT 2001 workshop, we invite you to post your
    general
    questions to panelist, keynote speakers, plenary and distinguished
    lectures online.

    You can post your general question online through FLINT homepage or send

    your general questions related to the following topics:
    -----------------------------------------------
    Search Engines
    Retrieving Information
    Database Querying
    Ontology
    Content Management
    Recognition Technology
    Data Mining
    Summarization
    Information Aggregation and Fusion
    E-Commerce
    Intelligent Agents
    Customization and Personalization

    To: Masoud Nikravesh; nikravesh@cs.berkeley.edu
    Subject: FLINTQP

    2. Mark your Calendar and visit FLINT homepage; August 14-17;
    4:00pm-6:30pm

    You can post your question live through Internet and be part of
    discussion panel

    3. Present your papers Virtually: You cannot attend this important even,

    be part of the workshop through Internet by sending the following:

    a. Your papers (Six Pages Maximum)
    b. Your PowerPoint presentation (10 Slides Maximum)
    c. Your papers will be presented through Internet during the workshop
    and selected papers will be presented from 9:00am-10:00am during
    workshop through automatic slide projectors in workshop rooms.
    d. With full registration, the accepted papers will be considered for
    publication in workshop proceedings. Selected papers will also be
    considered for publication in special journal issues and books.

    Send the above information to:

    To: Masoud Nikravesh; nikravesh@cs.berkeley.edu
    Subject: FLINTVirtual

    Deadline for publication: August 15, 2001
    Deadline for posting your questions; One day before the panel or
    presentation.
    =====================================================

    F L I N T 2 0 0 1
    NEW DIRECTIONS IN ENHANCING THE POWER OF THE INTERNET
    2001 BISC INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

    AUGUST 14-18, 2001

    HP Auditorium
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
    University Of California
    Berkeley, CA USA

    =====================================================

    http://bisc7.eecs.berkeley.edu/BISC/flint2001/default.htm

    Panel Discussion: TUESDAY, AUGUST 14
    Search Engine and Queries: Challenges and Road Ahead
    Rebecca Roberts; KQED TV
    Masoud Nikravesh; University of California, Berkeley
    Panel of Experts: Mori Anvari, C. Lee Giles, Jim Gray, Marti Hearst,
    Trevor Martin
    ---------------------------------

    Panel Discussion: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
    Internet and Academia: Challenges
    Rebecca Roberts; KQED TV
    Masoud Nikravesh; University of California, Berkeley
    John Yen The Pennsylvania State University
    Panel: Fernando Gomide, John Meech, Elie Sanchez, Tomohiro Takagi, I.
    Burhan Turksen, Mihaela Ulieru, Ronald Yager, Lotfi A. Zadeh,
    --------------------------------------

    Panel Discussion: THURSDAY, AUGUST 16
    Soft Computing: Past, Present, Future
    Rebecca Roberts; KQED TV
    Lotfi A. Zadeh and Masoud Nikravesh; University of California, Berkeley

    Panel: Jim Baldwin, Hamid Berenji, Abe Mamdani, Tomohiro Takagi, Burhan
    Turksen, Ronald Yager, Lotfi A. Zadeh

    Panel Discussion: FRIDAY, AUGUST 17
    Internet and Industry: Challenges
    Rebecca Roberts; KQED TV
    Masoud Nikravesh; University of California, Berkeley
    Panel: B. Azvin (BTexact Technologies), T. Cowden (Sonalysts), B. Hodjat
    (Dejima), Dilip B. Kotak (NRC, Canada), J. Shanahan (Xerox), M. Shan
    (HP), D. Yadegar (Arsin)
    =======================================================

    Panel Discussion: TUESDAY, AUGUST 14
    Search Engine and Queries: Challenges and Road Ahead

    Humans have a remarkable capability (perception) to perform a wide
    variety of physical and mental tasks without any measurements or
    computations. Familiar examples of such tasks are: playing golf,
    assessing wine, recognizing distorted speech, and summarizing a story.
    The question is whether a special type information retrieval processing
    strategy can be designed that build in human perception.

    One of the problems that Internet users are facing today is to find the
    desired and relevant information correctly and effectively in an
    environment that the available information, the repositories of
    information, indexing, and tools are all dynamic. Even though some tools
    were developed for a dynamic environment, they are suffering from "too
    much" or " too little" information retrieval. Some tools return too few
    resources and some tool returns too many resources.

    To solve the above problem to some extend, it is important to use
    user-defined queries to retrieve useful information according to certain
    measures. Even though techniques exist for locating exact matches,
    finding relevant partial matches might be a problem. It may not be also
    easy to specify query requests precisely and completely - resulting in a
    situation known as a imprecise-querying. It is usually not a problem for
    small domains and structured database, but for large unstructured
    repositories such as World Wide Web and distributed databases; a request
    specification becomes a bottleneck. Thus, a flexible retrieval
    algorithm is required, allowing for imprecise or query specification and
    search.

    “In my view, among the many ways in which fuzzy logic may be employed,
    there are two that stand out in importance. The first is search.
    Another, and less obvious, is deduction in an unstructured and imprecise
    environment.” Professor Lotfi A. Zadeh, (Father of Fuzzy Logic),
    Berkeley-California, 2001.

    “We need a semantic web which will provide guarantees, and about which
    one can reason with logic. (A fuzzy system might be good for finding a
    proof -- but then it should be able to go back and justify each
    deduction logically to produce a proof in the unifying HOL language,
    which anyone can check). Any real SW system will work not by believing
    anything it reads on the web but by checking the source of any
    information. (I wish people would learn to do this on the Web as it is.”
    Tim Barnes-Lee (Father of WWW), Cambridge-Massachusetts, 1999.

    “For example, World Wide Web search engines have become the most
    heavily- used online services, with millions of searches performed each
    day. Their popularity is due, in part, to their ease of use. While
    searches may retrieve thousands of hits, finding relevant partial
    matches might be a problem. The estimated user of wireless devices is
    estimated 1 billion within 2003 and 95 % of all wireless devices will be
    Internet enabled within 2005.” BISC-FLINT program, Berkeley-California,
    2001.

    ===================================
    Panel Discussion: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
    Internet and Academia: Challenges

    At the dawn of the new millennium, we can expect dramatic increase in
    the use of intelligent systems in the internet applications, since we
    have to deal with an increasing amount of data, that is mainly
    unstructured, dynamic and designed for human access. Therefore, it is
    usually hard to extract relevant information automatically. These
    aspects will be reflected in the subjects treated at this panel
    discussion.
    The main purpose of the discussion panel is to draw the attention of the
    academic community as well as the industrial community to the
    fundamental importance of specific Internet-related problems. This issue
    is critically significant about problems that center on search and
    deduction in large, unstructured and distributed knowledge bases, and
    the use of intelligent techniques in e-business and B2B applications.
    The panel will provide a unique opportunity for the academic and
    corporate communities to address new challenges, share solutions, and
    discuss research directions for the future.

    ================================
    Panel Discussion: THURSDAY, AUGUST 16
    Soft Computing: Past, Present, Future

    Internet applications such as search engines and financial decisions
    have become the corners stone of online services, with hundreds of
    millions of transactions performed each day and billions of financing
    decisions made each year serving hundreds of billion dollars industry.
    Their importance and popularity are due, in part, to their power and
    ease of use. However, finding decision-relevant and query-relevant
    information from incomplete, imprecise, perception-based, and
    inconsistent data is a challenging problem, which has to be addressed.
    Soft computing provides technologies for dealing with imprecise
    information using fuzzy logic, neuro-computing, evolutionary
    computation, and other intelligent system technologies.

    The main focus of this panel discussion will be on issues related to
    soft computing and the Internet, including search engines, web crawlers,
    web queries, web mining, decision support and risk analysis, and
    applications to e-commerce and e-business. The panel will provide an
    open forum so that a distinguished panel of experts discuss and exchange
    their thoughts, concerns and ideas about the past and present of soft
    computing. The panel will also explore the future challenges, share
    solutions and discuss research directions and applications of soft
    computing for the future.

    ============================
    Panel Discussion: FRIDAY, AUGUST 17
    Internet and Industry

    At the dawn of the new millennium, we can expect dramatic increase in
    the use of intelligent systems in the internet applications, since we
    have to deal with an increasing amount of data, that is mainly
    unstructured, dynamic and designed for human access. Therefore, it is
    usually hard to extract relevant information automatically. These
    aspects will be reflected in the subjects treated at this panel
    discussion.
    The main purpose of the discussion panel is to draw the attention of the
    academic community as well as the industrial community to the
    fundamental importance of specific Internet-related problems. This issue
    is critically significant about problems that center on search and
    deduction in large, unstructured and distributed knowledge bases, and
    the use of intelligent techniques in e-business and B2B applications.
    The panel will provide a unique opportunity for the academic and
    corporate communities to address new challenges, share solutions, and
    discuss research directions for the future.

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