Re: literature on fuzzy logic in AI


Subject: Re: literature on fuzzy logic in AI
WSiler@aol.com
Date: Fri Nov 10 2000 - 17:26:21 MET


In a message dated 11/9/00 5:14:06 AM Central Standard Time, jdagys@tennis.lt
writes:

> could anyone please recommend any texts that would
> discuss the potential/use of fuzzy logic in AI research more generally,
> instead of developing particular fuzzy controller or expert system?
>

>From an AI viewpoint, the main advantage of fuzzy systems theory is that
fuzzy sets permit handling both ambiguities and contradictions. For example,
if we have a fuzzy set with members Ford, Mercedes and Chevrolet. Our
reasoning process has assigned grades of membership Ford 0.972, Mercedes
0.058 and Chevrolet 0.968. We are fairly sure that Mercedes is not true, but
cannot confidently distinguish between Ford and Chevrolet. Since all three
possibilities are mutually exclusive, Ford and Chevrolet cannot both be true;
we have a contradiction. If, however, our possibilities were Undesirable (0),
Somewhat-Desirable (.87) and Very-Desirable (.83), Somewhat-Desirable and
Very-Desirable might both be true to some extent; in this case we have an
ambiguity.

There is a short manual Building Fuzzy Expert Systems on my Web page
http://users/aol.com/wsiler/ which deals with this topic in more detail.
While the manual leans on our fuzzy expert system shell FLOPS, the principles
are not dependent on any particular system.

William Siler

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In a message dated 11/9/00 5:14:06 AM Central Standard Time, jdagys@tennis.lt
writes:


could anyone please recommend any texts that would
discuss the potential/use of fuzzy logic in AI research more generally,
instead of developing particular fuzzy controller or expert system?


From an AI viewpoint, the main advantage of fuzzy systems theory is that
fuzzy sets permit handling both ambiguities and contradictions. For example,
if we have a fuzzy set with members Ford, Mercedes and Chevrolet. Our
reasoning process has assigned grades of membership Ford 0.972, Mercedes
0.058 and Chevrolet 0.968. We are fairly sure that Mercedes is not true, but
cannot confidently distinguish between Ford and Chevrolet. Since all three
possibilities are mutually exclusive, Ford and Chevrolet cannot both be true;
we have a contradiction. If, however, our possibilities were Undesirable (0),
Somewhat-Desirable (.87) and Very-Desirable (.83), Somewhat-Desirable and
Very-Desirable might both be true to some extent; in this case we have an
ambiguity.

There is a short manual Building Fuzzy Expert Systems on my Web page
http://users/aol.com/wsiler/ which deals with this topic in more detail.
While the manual leans on our fuzzy expert system shell FLOPS, the principles
are not dependent on any particular system.

William Siler
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